Oh The Drama! Super Bowl Ads Go Epic

With 30-second spots going for as much as $4 million and more than 111 million viewers expected to tune in, marketers are constantly looking for ways to make their ads stand out. And it’s increasingly difficult to captivate viewers with short-form plots involving babies, celebrities, sex and humor — unless there’s a compelling story attached.

Automakers’ Super Bowl Spots Rule YouTube

Carmakers’ Super Bowl commercials like the Mercedes Benz spot starring Kate Upton so far are dominating viewership among the big game’s ads on YouTube. Car company Super Bowl teases or commercials scheduled to run during the big game held the top five spots as of 10 a.m. ET Thursday, YouTube owner Google said Thursday.

Super Bowl’s Six Most-Anticipated Ads

Sex will sell this year, with supermodel Kate Upton’s Mercedes-Benz spot drawing the most buzz. Other winners: VW, Toyota and Doritos.

Super Bowl Viewers Get Peek At Ads

Super Bowl advertisers no longer are keeping spots a secret until the Big Game. They’re releasing online snippets of their ads or longer video trailers that allude to the action in the Game Day spot. It’s an effort to squeeze more publicity out of advertising’s biggest stage by creating pregame buzz.

Media Buyer’s Primer To The Super Bowl

How many people will watch, what are the hot spots, what sort of exposure those high-priced ads buy, how many watch just for the commercials and more.

Marketers Roll Out Super Bowl Teasers

Mercedes-Benz and Volkswagen have released well-received teasers in anticipation of next Sunday. While consumers have an idea of what to expect from a handful of advertisers, the rest of the ad playing field is wide open. There is, however, a general consensus on what can be expected.

Five Super Bowl Ad Trends To Watch

Spots are being rolled out online well before the game to build buzz. Plus: More auto ads, fan involvement, new advertisers and longer commercials.

CBS Sells Out Super Bowl At Record Prices

Whichever team comes out on top during Super Bowl XLVII, CBS is already a winner. CEO Leslie Moonves confirmed Tuesday that all of the available advertising slots in the game have been sold at a record average price of about $3.8 million, with some going for more than $4 million. That’s up from an average of about $3.5 million that :30s sold for on NBC last year.

Pepsi Adds Fans To Super Bowl Halftime

Pepsi announced Friday that fans will introduce the Grammy-winning diva when she takes the stage Feb. 3 at New Orleans’ Mercedes-Benz Superdome. A contest that kicks off Saturday will allow fans to submit photos of themselves in various poses, including head bopping, feet tapping and hip shaking and 50 of those who submit photos — along with a friend — will be selected to introduce the singer.

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Who’s Buying What In Super Bowl 2013

Advertisers’ plans for Super Bowl XLVII in New Orleans are beginning to become clear. As CBS works to sell the last handful of spots, ad packages are going for an average of $3.7 million to $3.8 million, meaning the Super Bowl represents perhaps the biggest investment a marketer may make in a single media property all year.

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Who’s Buying What in Super Bowl 2013

One of this year’s unexpected Super Bowl ads will come from Gildan Activewear, a supplier of printed T-shirts and other athletic apparel that now wants to boost its brand.

Marketers Start Super Bowl Build Up Earlier

Usually, marketers that decide to buy commercials during the coming Super Bowl wait until after New Year’s Day to start telling the public and press about their plans. But this year, several new Super Bowl advertisers are teasing the contents in advance and providing entire commercials before the game.

Super Bowl Spots, Near $4M, Near Gone

With Gineral Motors on the sidelines, the average price for a 30-second spot hits a record $3.8 million with 5% of the inventory left. CBS expects a sell-out, and more than $225 million in revenue.

Bridgestone Surrenders Super Bowl Halftime

While the company will still be known as the “Official Tire of the National Football League,” it is shifting its focus from the halftime show it’s sponsored since 2008.