ATSC 3.0 Call for Proposals Coming Soon

In the next couple of weeks, the Advanced Televisions Standards Committee will issue a call for proposals for ATSC 3.0 — a new physical layer that aims to bring broadcasting in 4K and multiscreen viewing to fruition — to broadcasters, consumer electronic manufacturers and professional equipment manufacturers.

The Advanced Televisions Standards Committee wants the latest and greatest ideas about the next-generation standard of television.

In the next couple of weeks, the ATSC will issue a call for proposals (CFP) for ATSC 3.0 — a new physical layer that aims to bring broadcasting in 4K and multiscreen viewing to fruition — to broadcasters, consumer electronic manufacturers and professional equipment manufacturers.

ATSC President Mark Richer hopes to have the CFP out by the first on the month. While he wouldn’t comment on what attributes will be included in the proposal, he says those submit a response essentially get to take a blank sheet of paper and innovate. “It’s completely open. We hope to get a lot of good proposals to evaluate.”

The ATSC Technology Group 3, led by James Kutzner, PBS senior director of advanced technology, will evaluate all responses.

Responses are due at the end of August, with detailed descriptions due at the end of September.

Currently, ATSC 2.0 — an enhancement of the current generation TV standard — is on its way to becoming a candidate standard with a target date of May. Being elected as a candidate standard is the first of three steps to becoming a finalized standard. ATSC hopes to finalize the standard by year’s end.

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ATSC 2.0 allows broadcast viewers to store and watch video on demand — in non-real time — and call up graphics and data. It also aims to let markets broadcast interactive and targeted advertising.


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Cheryl Daly says:

March 19, 2013 at 5:13 pm

Here’s an idea that is just wishful thinking and science fiction fantasy on my part, but given that one of the goals of ATSC 2.0 and 3.0 is to provide a better viewer experience, wouldn’t it be nice if one of the features of the new standard would allow my home receiver the option of stripping the incoming signal of any network or local channel ID bug, logo, or non-emergency scrolling ticker at the bottom of the screen during a program? Currently, the gorgeous high definition picture that networks and stations spend a lot of money and time to create and broadcast is ruined by the increasing amount of graphics that are left on the screen to irritate and alienate the audience.


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