Gannett Buying Thousands Of iPhones, iPads

An internal memo says the devices will be given to its newspaper staffs to “meet the demands of the new news cycle, one that requires agility in real-time reporting, social media and greater emphasis on video storytelling, further increasing our competitive advantage.”

A leaked memo from USA Today parent company Gannett Co. says the company has bought “thousands” of Apple iPhones and iPads for its newspapers. The devices will begin arriving in January, with training starting “several weeks later.”

The revelations were reported by Gannett Blog, a website not affiliated with the company. It posted a memo from Bob Dickey, Gannett’s U.S. newspaper division president.

Some excerpts:

“Readers’ speedy adoption of new technology for news consumption creates new opportunities for us to uniquely serve them. To do so, we must ensure our journalists are equipped and trained on the tools to work in new ways.

“We’re excited to announce a significant investment in our newsgathering tools. This week, we have purchased thousands of new devices for many of our journalists. These include:

“In every local market, we have the most and the best journalists. These new tools will help our journalists meet the demands of the new news cycle, one that requires agility in real-time reporting, social media and greater emphasis on video storytelling, further increasing our competitive advantage.

BRAND CONNECTIONS

“Taken together, the tools and training should not only make our journalists more effective at their existing work, but also enable them to do new things we can’t even imagine yet.”

Read the Gannett Blog story here.


Comments (6)

Leave a Reply

Christina Perez says:

December 22, 2011 at 3:46 pm

Can’t wait to see reporters try to write stories on the simulated keyboard. Why not just supply staffers with a decent laptop or even netbook? This is called taking “trendy” to absurd lengths.

lynnette zaner says:

December 22, 2011 at 4:04 pm

I’m guessing reporters are going to start using the front and rear facing cameras to do live shots over 3G networks. Might look a bit subpar but it will be cheap-cheaper than sending a reporter, photog and microwave gear.

    Christina Perez says:

    December 22, 2011 at 4:14 pm

    Story is about newspapers, not TV, and newspapers into video who don’t use gear, and people, capable of delivering professional video will suffer the consequences of a dissatisfied audience.

Teri Green says:

December 22, 2011 at 4:19 pm

American’s consistently have said, with their pocketbooks we want quantity and convenience over quality. MP3s, cellphones and such are vastly inferior to CDs and landlines, but not so much inferior that consumers don’t prefer them. Americans want coverage NOW on bad cameras, rather than great HD coverage later. After all a picture is a picture, is the event anymore newsworthy if you can see the blood on a guy’s face in clear HD. Content is what really matters

    Christina Perez says:

    December 22, 2011 at 4:43 pm

    Think about the absurdity of what you’re saying the next time you watch the beautifully composed and lit video of 60 Minutes in high definition.

Brian Walshe says:

December 23, 2011 at 1:39 pm

Newspapers are trying to move their coverage over to the 21st century version of paper. And to present the coverage in the way they believe consumers consume it. IE: Offer soup in a bowl with a spoon.

Since the coverage is consumed on the web or small-screen devices, the picture quality doesn’t need to have as many pixels ad HD TV to be useful to the consumer. TV stations routinely put cell-phone or iPhone video on the air live via SKYPE, iChat or other means… and I expect newspaper operated “new-paper” systems to use the tech in as many ways as it can be used. They’re trying to stay in business… which does mean jobs for people.


More News