NAB 2013

NAB’s Smith Urges Support For Mobile DTV

Noting that 25 more stations have said they will soon be offering a mobile DTV service, Smith told the crowd at today's NAB Show opening session that broadcasters have an advantage in the mobile marketplace. "Our one-to-many architecture allows us to deliver a product where there is no streaming necessary, so there's no signal congestion." And he urged broadcasters to "rise up to meet consumers' desire for more live, local TV content."

NAB President Gordon Smith today called on TV broadcasters to seize the opportunities afforded by mobile DTV and a next-generation broadcast standard.

Noting that 25 more stations have said they will soon be offering a mobile DTV service, Smith said broadcasters have an advantage in the mobile marketplace.

“Our one-to-many architecture allows us to deliver a product where there is no streaming necessary, so there’s no signal congestion,” he said at the NAB Show’s opening session.

“Our competitors in the wireless industry want to be part of the mobile TV business … and they are investing a lot of money in this endeavor.

“They are even branding their service ‘mobile TV.’ But our competitors will never have what we have — the ability to deliver our high-quality content reliably.”

A new broadcast standard will help broadcasters maintain their edge.

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It would give stations the “flexibility they need to better serve their viewers, compete in the mobile world and find new revenue streams.”

The Advanced Television Systems Committee formally began work on a new standard, dubbed ATSC 3.0, two weeks ago with a call for technology companies to bring forward systems that can be considered for the standard.

Smith also said it is important to explore other technologies like micro-targeted advertising to compete effectively.

And he urged broadcasters to “rise up to meet consumers’ desire for more live, local TV content.”


Comments (5)

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Christina Perez says:

April 8, 2013 at 3:29 pm

This comment is more apropos to this story than to the item about Dyle, so I reiterate: What made broadcast television the most efficient advertising medium on the planet? Free and clear over the air reception. Now that “wireless” is again the preferred mode of transmission, why would the scions of broadcast TV risk limiting the mass audience by requiring viewers to sign up for proprietary services that are a “bait and switch” subterfuge by which to transform OTA broadcast TV into a pay medium? The people in charge should think very carefully before they throw the baby out with the bath water. What’s needed is a more robust DTV modulation scheme — not pay TV in disguise.

Ellen Samrock says:

April 8, 2013 at 4:09 pm

Here again, getting mobile device manufacturers and wireless providers on board with a built-in ATSC M/H tuner is going to be an uphill climb. The NAB is still trying to get FM radio in all cellphones. And an after market ATSC dongle device is a loser with consumers, just ask the HD Radio folks. But by not adding an ATSC tuner, wireless companies are creating a false need–the need for more broadband spectrum even though broadcast TV can deliver the same content far more economically and at better quality.

Bill Greep says:

April 8, 2013 at 4:17 pm

I agree PhillyPhlash… and the fact that OTA broadcasters allowed 2 competing mobile entities to send consumers a mixed message is a problem that the NAB best clear up soon or they risk mobile being left in the dust. The service should be free to be effective. Or simply keep the simulcasts free and upcharge special “subscription” options (on demand, extended play etc).

    John Murray says:

    April 8, 2013 at 7:43 pm

    “…the fact that OTA broadcasters allowed 2 competing mobile entities to send consumers a mixed message is a problem that the NAB best clear up soon…” Agreed.

Gregg Palermo says:

April 8, 2013 at 8:17 pm

too little, too late; TV stations are not unlike like the railroad companies that failed in the last century by imagining themselves to be in the “train” business rather than the transportation business: television stations are in the video content delivery business, NOT the “broadcast” business; those who forget history of technology are doomed to make the same mistakes


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